Scrivener.net

Sunday, July 12, 2009

Seen around and about... 

Marriage announcements of women who should not have hyphenated their names. No matter how liberated they were. Really.


You know things are getting rough in the mortgage market when banks are suing themselves over defaulting.

...court documents clearly label "Wells Fargo Bank NA" as the plaintiff and "Wells Fargo Bank NA" as a defendant ...

Wells Fargo hired Florida Default Law Group., P.L., of Tampa, Fla., to file the lawsuit against itself. And then Wells Fargo hired another Tampa law firm -- Kass, Shuler, Solomon, Spector, Foyle & Singer P.A. -- to defend itself against its own lawsuit ...

Wells Fargo's defense lawyers even filed an answer to their client's own complaint: "Defendant admits that it is the owner and holder of a mortgage encumbering the subject real property," the answer reads. "All other allegations of the complaint are denied"...


Compuserve is dead. It was the first major commercial online service, hosted the first "chat rooms" (called "CB simulators" after CB radio channels) and trademarked the term "email" for its popular messaging service. Originally an in-house network for an insurer...
Access [by the public] was granted generally outside of business hours, when CompuServe's mainframes were normally idle. In 1981, the cost for 300 baud access was $5.00 an hour during non-peak hours (6 p.m. to 5 a.m. weekdays and all day on weekends and holidays); $22.50 an hour during peak hours (5 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays). The service was a hit ...

"It doesn't matter what kind of computer you own. You'll use Compuserve's Electronic Mail System (We call it EMailTM) to compose, edit, and send letters ..." [advertisement]
$5 an hour in 1981 was worth $12 in today's money, $22.50 was worth $53. You probably can't even imagine how slow 300 baud was.

(Yes, I remember. I never used Compuserve myself but had business associates who did and had to contact them through it using my employer's dial-up service, and later my own. Of course, all this was long before there was anything like a "Web" or a "browser".)

For all that, it sure started something. RIP.